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E-News August 2013

Friends of Acadia August 2013 E-News
Dear Friends:

Can you believe summer is halfway gone? Between annual events, volunteer programs, and partnership projects with the park, we at Friends of Acadia sometimes have to remind ourselves to pause and breathe in the fresh ocean air. If you’re in Acadia this month, we hope you’ll do the same.

We also hope you’ll stop to appreciate the great condition Acadia is in. With volunteers, the Acadia Youth Conservation Corps, and Acadia’s dedicated trail crew poviding regular trail maintenance, some entirely new trails completed and in progress, freshly graded carriage roads free of weeds and erosion, sensitive vegetation protected from trampling with low-key barriers, active management of invasive plants, and a bright new buoy in Jordan Pond providing water-quality data to a team of UMaine scientists, you can feel proud of all the work that’s being done to care for the park. These things couldn’t happen without the support of Friends of Acadia members, volunteers, and partners.

This E-News focuses on different ways that Acadia’s friends are caring for the park. If one of these projects speaks to you, we hope you’ll join in! Thank you for all you do for this magnificent place.


Benefit Preview CatalogFriends of Acadia 24th Annual Benefit: Our hundreds of amazing volunteers, event patrons, and auction item donors are working together to support a wonderful evening this Saturday, August 10. This is Friends of Acadia’s big fundraising event each year, providing essential unrestricted funds that allow us to manage the programs that make such a difference in Acadia.

The live and silent auctions are the highlight of the event, with more than 100 fabulous items, many one-of-a-kind. Take a peek at the online Auction Preview Catalog!

Can’t come to the Benefit? Absentee bids are a great way to contribute to the evening’s success, helping to build bidding momentum quickly! Absentee bids are due to the Friends of Acadia office by noon on Friday, August 9. More information »

 


Speaking Up for Acadia: On July 25, Friends of Acadia president David MacDonald traveled to Washington to testify before the full US Senate Committee on Energy & Natural Resources about the critical need for adequate federal funding for national parks and about the many positive impacts the parks offer the US economy and the American people. He was invited to participate in the hearing due to FOA’s experience and track record of success in balancing private and public funding strategies at addressing needs at Acadia National Park.

In particular, David explained that private individuals have a strong desire to contribute toward Acadia’s well-being, but their enthusiasm for giving back decreases when they feel the federal government is not meeting its responsibility to fund the parks. “Our donors are not inspired to invest if the government is disinvesting,” he said. You can watch the full hearing online »

We invite you to add your voice to David’s, and let your legislators know that Acadia National Park is important to you. The Friends of Acadia website has information to help you find contact information for your state senators »


Beech Cliffs$5,000 Westside Challenge: This is our third challenge grant from an anonymous Friends of Acadia member to fund trail work on the west side of Mount Desert Island! To receive the challenge money we must raise $5,000 for from members and donors first.

Do you love hiking the Acadia Mountain Trail, Beech Cliff Loop, or Perpendicular Trail? Did you bring your kids (or grandparents!) up Flying Mountain? Maybe the quiet woods on Western Mountain are your style. This is a great way to make a difference on the trails that make a difference for you.

To join the effort and make a contribution to be matched, simply visit our secure online donation page. Be sure to note that the gift is for the “Westside Challenge.” Or, if you prefer, call the office at 800-625-0321 to charge your gift. Happy hiking!


Clean Water, Clean Shores: Community members of Mount Desert Island and neighboring islands are invited to volunteer to clean up coastal shorelines in the fourth annual Clean Water, Clean Shores cleanup. Volunteers will be directed to shorelines of Acadia National Park on Mount Desert Island or be taken by boat to nearby islands, including Black, Eagle, Lamp, Pond, and Sheep Islands. Opportunities to join a kayak caravan or see Acadia from a rarely-visited island make this a fun—as well as valuable—cleanup event.

Free boat transportation, water, and snacks will be provided to all registered volunteers. Boats fill up quickly, so early registration is strongly encouraged. There will be a cookout at the Seal Cove boat ramp following the cleanup. To register, contact Terry Begley at Friends of Acadia at 207-288-3340 or terry@friendsofacadia.org. You must register to be assigned to a cleanup location.


Paint the Parks

Calling all Acadia artists and art lovers! PaintTheParks.com is a new online initiative that aims to connect park-minded artists with park-minded art buyers. Participating artists contribute to preservation of special natural places, donating a minimum of 10% from the sale of their park paintings to state and national park associations including Friends of Acadia.

Project founder Karin H. Leonard’s personal quest is to paint many parks, and to donate from the sale of those paintings to the respective park foundations; through PaintTheParks.com she offers a portal for others to do the same. She says, “Through painting, purchasing, and donating, you protect precious nature reserves for future generations.”

Cobblestones

The new Friends of Acadia blog offers an inside glimpse of Acadia and the people and projects that keep it humming. Recent posts include:

August Wild Gardens Update

Walking in the Footsteps of Giants

Jordan Pond Buoy: Data from the First Week!

Rainy Day Destinations

Family Fun Day

…plus the weekly “Friday Quote.” We hope you’ll take a look! You never know what you might learn about this special place.

“Conservation of land and conservation of people frequently go hand in hand.” —Eleanor Roosevelt